Thursday, December 1 2022

MISSION IS TO RAISING AWARENESS ABOUT ORGAN DONATION. >> I’M STILL INCREDIBLY SAD THAT LOGAN WAS NOT HERE AND WE GAVE HIM, BUT I KNOW IT’S A SILVER LINER. THIS IS SOMETHING THAT IS THE SUNSHINE RATE OF SUCH A TRAGEDY THAT WE KNOW IT WAS AN IMPACT, IT MADE A DIFFERENCE. ASHLEY: LOGAN DIED WHEN HE WAS 21. HIS PARENTS SAY HE WAS A YOUNG MAN WITH BIG DREAMS. >> HE WANTED TO BE AN ARCHEOLOGIST OR A HOCKEY PLAYER. INDIANA JONES OR SIDNEY CROSBY, TAKE YOUR CHOICE, THAT’S WHAT H WANTED TO DO. ASHLEY: ONE DAY AFTER THE CRASH, LONGA DIED. BEFORE HIS DEATH, HE TOLD HIS FATHER THAT HE WANT TO BE A GOLDEN ORGAN, NOT INSPIRED BY HIS MENTOR AND COACH WHO DIED THE YEAR BEFORE. >> I looked at it and said that was nice. BEING 85 IN NOBODY WILL WANT YOUR ORGANS AND I KIND LAUGHED AND HE DIDN’T LAUGH. >> HE MADE SIX LIVES FILL YOUR HEART, LUNGS, KIDNEYS, LIVER AND TWO CORNEAS. HE TOOK CONTROL OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND BECAME THE LOGAN EECFFT, THEN HE BECAME THE LOGAN BOUTLE EFFECT. ASHLEY: IN THE DAYS FOLLOWING HIDES ATH, MORE THAN 150 THOUSAND PEOPLE REGISTERED TO BECOME ORGAN DONORS. THIS IS THE LARGEST NUMBER AND IN CANADIAN HISTORY DUE TO ONE PERSON. HERE IN PITTSBURGH, DOCTORS AT UPMC CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SAY HIS STORY IS A JOURNEY OF INSPIRATION >> WHAT BETTER WAY TO HONOR THIS LIST OF CHILDREN — THEN WISH TO EXTEND THEIR LEGACY, TNHA TO DO WHAT THEY REALLY WANT TO DO IN THIS HARD TIME JOURNEY > > IT HAS FILLED SIX LIVES. ASHLEY: MORE THAN 100,000 PEOPLE ARE WAITING FOR A LIFE-SAVING ORGAN TRANSPLANT. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE OUR

Canadian hockey player killed in bus accident helps save 6 lives through organ donation

April is National Gift of Life Month

Four years ago, 16 people, including members of a Canadian junior hockey team, were killed when their bus and a tractor-trailer collided. One of these players, Logan Boulet, went on to help save several lives through organ donation. On Monday, her parents and sister visited UPMC Children’s Hospital to share their story. Watch the full report in the video player above. “I’m still incredibly sad that Logan isn’t here and that we lost him, but I know it’s a silver lining, it’s something, it’s a ray of sunshine of such tragedy that we know that he had an impact, that he made a difference,” said Logan’s mother, Bernadine Boulet. Logan died when he was just 21. His parents said he was a young man with big dreams.”He wanted to be an archaeologist or a hockey player, Indiana Jones or Sidney Crosby. Take your pick. That’s what he wanted to do,” said Toby Boulet, Logan’s father. day after the accident, on April 7, 2018, Logan died. Before his death, Logan told his father that he wanted to be an organ donor because he was inspired by his mentor and coach who died the year before. “I looked at him and said that’s fine, you’ll be 85 and no one will want your organs, and I kind of laughed, and he didn’t laugh, and he told me. looked He said, no daddy, if Ric can donate his organs and save six lives, so can I,” Toby Boulet said. And that’s exactly what Logan did. “It took over social media, and it became the Logan Effect, and then it became the Logan Boulet Effect,” Toby Boulet said. the largest number in Canadian history due to a single event, and ultimately a single person. Here in Pittsburgh, doctors at UPMC Children’s Hospital say Logan’s story is inspirational. what they really wanted to do in this difficult time,” said Dr. George Mazariegos, Chief of Pediatric Transplantation at the hospital. “He made six lives fuller, heart, lungs, kidneys, kidneys, liver and two corneas…we say he made six lives fuller,” Toby Boulet said. April is National Gift of Life Month. To register as an organ donor, sign up at registerme.org. According to the Center for Organ Recovery & Education, nationwide, more than 100,000 people are waiting for lifesaving organ transplants.

Four years ago, 16 people, including members of a Canadian junior hockey team, were killed when their bus and a tractor-trailer collided.

One of these players, Logan Boulet, went on to help save several lives through organ donation.

On Monday, her parents and sister visited UPMC Children’s Hospital to share their story.

Watch the full report in the video player above.

“I’m still incredibly sad that Logan isn’t here and that we lost him, but I know it’s a silver lining, it’s something that’s a ray of sunshine from such a tragedy that we know that he had an impact, that he made a difference,” said Logan’s mother, Bernadine Boulet.

Logan died when he was just 21. His parents said he was a young man with big dreams.

“He wanted to be an archaeologist or a hockey player, Indiana Jones or Sidney Crosby. Make your choice. That’s what he wanted to do,” said Toby Boulet, Logan’s father.

But a day after the accident, on April 7, 2018, Logan died. Before his death, Logan told his father that he wanted to be an organ donor because he had been inspired by his mentor and trainer who had died the year before.

“I looked at him and said it was fine, you’ll be 85 and no one will want your organs, and I laughed, and he didn’t laugh, and he looked at me and said, no dad, if Ric can donate his organs and save six lives, so can I,” said Toby Boulet.

And that’s exactly what Logan did.

“It took over social media, and it became the Logan effect, and then it became the Logan Boulet effect,” Toby Boulet said.

In the days following Logan’s death, more than 150,000 people signed up to become organ donors. This is the largest number in Canadian history due to a single event, and ultimately a single person.

Here in Pittsburgh, doctors at UPMC Children’s Hospital say Logan’s story is inspirational.

“What better way to honor this child’s wish and extend his legacy than to do what he really wanted to do during this difficult time,” said Dr. George Mazariegos, head of the pediatric transplant department at the hospital. .

“He made six lives fuller, heart, lungs, kidneys, kidneys, liver and two corneas…we say he made six lives fuller,” Toby Boulet said.

April is National Gift of Life Month. To register as an organ donor, register at registerme.org.

According to the Center for Organ Recovery & Education, nationwide more than 100,000 people are waiting for lifesaving organ transplants.

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